Winter starting to snowball on budgets

TROTWOOD, Ohio (WDTN) – A harsh winter has everyone from the state level to cities digging deeper into their pockets to battle the elements.

It has road crews across the state ready for a break in the season.

“You know it’s going to end at some point,” said Dalton Hines, Public Works Operations Manager for Trotwood.

It something the city of Trotwood is looking forward to seeing.

The winter has already taken its toll on their salt supply. The city recently had to drive 250 tons of salt across the state as supplies started to dwindle.

“The severe weather is taking its toll on the roadways,” said Hines. “We’ve got potholes everywhere. We’re putting extra work into that.”

Hines estimates the city has spent thirty percent more battling the elements this winter compared to last year.

The outlook is the same at the county level.

Engineers in Montgomery County said one of the worst winters in decades is beginning to go deep into your budget.

“Already, we’re at about fifty percent more use of salt and overtime than we had last year,” said Paul Gruner, Montgomery County Engineer.

January brought a new fiscal year for the county budget. The month also brought a new challenge for road crews battling historical levels of cold and snow.

Gruner said they are already halfway through what was budgeted for winter weather in 2014.

The Ohio Department of Transportation has also seen their costs rise.

The costs of salt, maintenance, pothole repairs, and man power has reached more than $9 million this winter. That total is $1.5 million more than was spent all of last winter and more than three times what was spent the winter before.

If next winter starts off the same, Gruner said the county will have to pull from other resources such as spring and summer maintenance projects.

“We’ll have to cut back on some materials as the year goes on depending on how the winter goes,” said Gruner. “We may have to shift some money around in December if we need to to get by.”

blog comments powered by Disqus