Mayor calls for change following dog mauling

Klonda Richey killed by two dogs on E. Bruce Avenue in Dayton.  (Photo/provided)
Klonda Richey killed by two dogs on E. Bruce Avenue in Dayton. (Photo/provided)

DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN)- The dog mauling death of a Dayton woman last week has the city’s mayor calling for action.

Mayor Nan Whaley told 2 NEWS she believes the city has an issue with dogs, but is hampered by weak state legislation.

“We will be looking into if there is more the city can do and again, this is a partnership effort,” said Whaley. She said it will take tougher statewide ordinances, cooperation with the county’s Animal Resource Center and the Dayton Police Department.

“Obviously we’re devastated by the tragedy that happened on Bruce Avenue. Our police department sees a lot, but this is something that has really affected them as well,” she added.

Investigators said the body of 57-year old Klonda Richey was found mauled to death outside her East Bruce Avenue home last Friday. Officials said Richey’s neighbor’s pitbull-mastiff mixes were responsible for the deadly attack. Officers shot and killed the animals at the scene. Police arrested the dog’s owners after the attack, but they were later released after the Montgomery County Prosecutor’s Office refused charges pending further investigation.

After hearing what Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley had to say about the city being hampered by weak legislation, 2 NEWS reached out to several state lawmakers about the law that pertains to “dangerous dogs,” “menacing dogs,” and “viscious dogs.”

Representative Jim Butler who represents parts of Dayton sent us the following statement:

“There is interest in reviewing the law (or any law relevant to a tragic outcome) to make sure it is adequate and appropriate to protect the public. However, the details of the investigation into the recent mauling are not yet fully known. When they are known, we will look at the law in light of the recent tragedy and make any needed changes.”

Earlier this week, Montgomery County Animal Resource Mark Kumpf told 2 NEWS as it stands right now, officers need to witness an attack or a loose dog before taking action. It can help, however, if people bring pictures of such activity to the center’s attention.

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