Satellite data indicates plane went down in Indian Ocean

Malaysia's acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein, center, answers questions, accompanied by Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya, left, and Malaysia's Department of Civil Aviation Director General Azharuddin Abdul Rahman at Putra World Trade Center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 24, 2014. Chinese and Australian planes on Monday spotted several objects in an area identified by multiple satellite images as containing possible debris from the missing Malaysian airliner, boosting hopes the frustrating search in the southern Indian Ocean could turn up more clues to the jet's fate. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)
Malaysia's acting Transport Minister Hishammuddin Hussein, center, answers questions, accompanied by Malaysia Airlines CEO Ahmad Jauhari Yahya, left, and Malaysia's Department of Civil Aviation Director General Azharuddin Abdul Rahman at Putra World Trade Center in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Monday, March 24, 2014. Chinese and Australian planes on Monday spotted several objects in an area identified by multiple satellite images as containing possible debris from the missing Malaysian airliner, boosting hopes the frustrating search in the southern Indian Ocean could turn up more clues to the jet's fate. (AP Photo/Joshua Paul)

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) –  Malaysia’s prime minister says a new analysis of satellite data indicates the missing Malaysia Airlines plane plunged into a remote corner of the Indian Ocean.

This Sunday, March 23, 2014 photo released by the Indian Navy, shows the navy personnel on board a P-8I aircraft during a search operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 aircraft in the southern Indian Ocean. Ships rushed to the location of floating objects spotted Monday by Australian and Chinese planes in the southern Indian Ocean close to where multiple satellites have detected possible remains of the lost Malaysian airliner. (AP Photo/Indian Navy)
This Sunday, March 23, 2014 photo released by the Indian Navy, shows the navy personnel on board a P-8I aircraft during a search operation for the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 aircraft in the southern Indian Ocean. Ships rushed to the location of floating objects spotted Monday by Australian and Chinese planes in the southern Indian Ocean close to where multiple satellites have detected possible remains of the lost Malaysian airliner. (AP Photo/Indian Navy)

Malaysia’s prime minister says a new analysis of satellite data indicates the missing Malaysia Airlines plane plunged into a remote corner of the Indian Ocean.

The news is a major breakthrough in the unprecedented two-week struggle to find out what happened to Flight 370. It disappeared shortly after takeoff from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing with 239 passengers and crew aboard on March 8.

The prime minister (Najib Razak) announced the news with what he called “deep sadness and regret” in a brief news conference. He said Malaysia Airlines has informed the families of passengers of the plane’s fate.

The Malaysian leader said the information was based on an analysis of satellite data from Inmarsat.

Today, ships are headed to an area of the southern Indian Ocean where floating objects were spotted. They include a vessel that has equipment to detect the plane’s black box.

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