Google Glass raises privacy issues

DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – It is a small device that is rethinking the way use technology.

“Basically, everything your cell phone can do on it and a little bit more,” said Drew Madison. He bought at Google Glass back in December. “You can take pictures, videos, text messages, and phone calls.”

It is something the mechanical engineering major at the University of Dayton knew he had to get.

As part of the Flyers cheerleading squad, it helped him capture one of the university’s biggest moments during a win against Syracuse University during the 2014 NCAA Tournament.

But it did not take long for the small device to get some negative attention.

“I was at Chipotle ordering once and one of the workers kind of questioned me,” said Madison. “‘Are you recording right now?’ I was like, ‘Why would I want to record you? You’re just making me some food’.”

Using Google Glass is like wearing a video camera on your head.

Some argue the camera, that works with the wink of an eye or a slide of the finger, could be an easy invasion of privacy.

“If you terrify people that anything that happens outside of the bedroom could be part of the permanent record of human history, you are really going to change the way some of us live,” said Anand Giridharadas, a New York Times columnist.

It almost got one Ohio man in serious trouble.

The Department of Homeland Security thought the man was illegally recording movies in a Columbus theater.

It was later determined Google Glass was part of his prescription eye-wear and the device was turned off.

Despite the stigma attached to these frames, Madison said it is nothing out of the ordinary.

“If someone really wanted to record something, they can be doing it with their cell phone or other devices that are on the market,” said Madison.

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