Dying Easter Eggs 101

This undated photo provided by A Thrifty Mom shows the use of shaving cream and liquid food coloring to dye hard-boiled eggs which gives them a tie-dyed effect. It's a tactile project most kids will enjoy. “Using shaving cream our kids thought it smelled great and had fun at every part of the project!" writes Sarah Barrand at her A Thrifty Mom blog. (AP Photo/A Thrifty Mom, Sarah Barrand)
This undated photo provided by A Thrifty Mom shows the use of shaving cream and liquid food coloring to dye hard-boiled eggs which gives them a tie-dyed effect. It's a tactile project most kids will enjoy. “Using shaving cream our kids thought it smelled great and had fun at every part of the project!" writes Sarah Barrand at her A Thrifty Mom blog. (AP Photo/A Thrifty Mom, Sarah Barrand)

DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – The eggs were on sale. They are boiled to perfection and the kids have dyed them in bright pastel colors.

Now, you have to be sure the Easter eggs are safe to eat.

Food safety specialists offer up this advice:

  •  Make sure the eggs do not sit out of the refrigerator for more than two hours before boiling and dying them
  •  Use food safe coloring
  •  Don’t let the eggs dry overnight on the counter
  • Keep the eggs in a separate container other than the original egg carton

“They could have some dirt and contamination on the outside, so after you’ve boiled them then they’re now clean and ready to eat food, so you don’t want to put them back into that dirty, potentially dirty carton that they came in,” said Londa Nwadike, Kansas State University Food Safety Specialist.

Safety must also be considered during your Easter egg hunt. Don’t hide the eggs on the ground or other places where they can pick up bacteria.

The experts say a little bit of preparation and thought will lead to a happy and healthy Easter celebration.

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