Progress being made in military mental health

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DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – There is progress in keeping some of our service men and women happier and healthier, but there is another group that now needs the top brass’s attention.

Suicide numbers for our active duty men and women are lower than last year. Unfortunately, the same numbers for reservists and national guard are going up.
Overall, suicide totals for Army, Navy, Air Force and Marines were lower for active duty. In fact, they dropped by more than 15% last year.

Reservists and the guard are not so lucky. According to the Vice President of Military Affairs at Wright State University, because they are not full time, they may be slipping under the radar, sometimes with the military mission getting in the way of the continuity of care.

In 2006, the suicide rate in the Army alone was twice the U. S. civilian rate. Multiple deployments make it tougher.

Mental health issues are finally coming to the forefront and the government is finally allocating the resources, but the wait list is still very long.

Local veterans who need help with mental stresses can call 937-268-6511, ext. 1362 or call the Veterans Suicide Hotline at 1-800-273-8255. provides commenting to allow for constructive discussion on the stories we cover. In order to comment here, you acknowledge you have read and agreed to our Terms of Service. Commenters who violate these terms, including use of vulgar language or racial slurs, will be banned. Please be respectful of the opinions of others and keep the conversation on topic and civil. If you see an inappropriate comment, please flag it for our moderators to review.

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