Dayton school district to outsource due to low fill rate

DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – Dayton public schools will soon outsource its reserve, or substitute, teachers to a private company.

A school board vote has sealed the fate of local teachers who protested against the proposal.

For nearly 30 years, the school district has worked with the Dayton Reserve Teachers Chapter, but Tuesday a six to one vote ended that relationship.

“… we have more vacancies that are not filled by our reserve teachers on the west side than we do the east side. This denies teaching services to the west side and this to me, it does meet the definition of institutional racism,” said Board Parliamentarian Joe Lacey.

“We really care, we care for these reserve teachers but we’re not able to do what they want to do and that is to serve us less and to serve us only in certain areas,” echoed Nancy Nerny, the board vice president.

Figures show that six west side schools have filled less than 75 percent of their need for reserve teachers.

2 NEWS called officials to dig deeper into why substitute teachers are declining these particular assignments.

They wouldn’t comment, but did note that their contract allows teachers to turn down any request.

We also found in the contract that any repeated declines could result in a teacher being fired.

The chapter President Donna Hill said the problem is a shortage of reserve teachers.

She thinks it’s a bad decision to outsource.

“It’s wasteful because if there are able to pay for profit company, our tax dollars actually could be better served here in our own community,” said Donna Hill.

The new contractor, Parallel Employment Group will begin this September.

The Wisconsin-based company has the option for an annual renewal.

Officials said the new contract will save taxpayers just over $1 million.

The school district plans to keep its current contract with reserve teachers until late August, when the term ends.

Officials said all teachers will be able to apply through the new contractor to teach in Dayton’s schools.

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