Local VA prepares for Ebola

In this photo provided by the UCLA Health System, doctors and staff participate in a preparadness exercise on diagnosing and treating patients with Ebola virus symptoms, at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. The exercise was observed by Los Angeles County health department officials. UCLA’s multi-pronged approach includes protocols for transporting patients through the hospital, disposing of trash and waste, dedicating equipment -- such as ventilators and X-ray machines -- for Ebola patient use only, setting up a mobile laboratory, acquiring specialized personal protective equipment and staff training. (AP Photo/UCLA Health System, Reed Hutchinson)
In this photo provided by the UCLA Health System, doctors and staff participate in a preparadness exercise on diagnosing and treating patients with Ebola virus symptoms, at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center in Los Angeles. The exercise was observed by Los Angeles County health department officials. UCLA’s multi-pronged approach includes protocols for transporting patients through the hospital, disposing of trash and waste, dedicating equipment -- such as ventilators and X-ray machines -- for Ebola patient use only, setting up a mobile laboratory, acquiring specialized personal protective equipment and staff training. (AP Photo/UCLA Health System, Reed Hutchinson)


DAYTON, Ohio (WDTN) – Local hospitals are responding to the Centers for Disease Control and the Ohio Department of Health in their recommendations for Ebola preparations.

The Dayton VA Medical Center, for instance, began its preps last week. Also, all seven hospitals within the Kettering Health Network began getting their staff ready to encounter the virus if necessary.

The Dayton VA reports its Ebola protocol goes beyond what is CDC required. It says it sets tougher standards when it comes to Ebola evaluation and protection.

Infectious disease expert Dr. Jack Bernstein says if someone presents at the hospital with diarrhea, vomiting and fever, doctors have to create a travel history. That includes asking if they have traveled to any countries within west Africa or if they have been taking care of Ebola infected patients.

“They would be isolated and there is a room in the emergency room and they would be placed there,” Bernstein said. “Following donning protective gowns, masks and gloves, they would be placed in another room in the intensive care unit.”

The proper removal of the protective clothing after caring for an Ebola infected patient is critical. According to Bernstein, Protective equipment removal was key for the two infected nurses at the Dallas hospital.

“It is my supposition when they took off those gowns they got it on their hands, touched their eyes or nose. When you take off your gown, you need a partner to prompt you to wash your hands and to make sure there is no breach of protocol.”

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