Teen who fought cancer treatment heading home from hospital

FILE - In this Thursday, Jan. 8, 2015, file photo, Jackie Fortin of Windsor Locks, Conn., speaks outside the Connecticut Supreme Court in Hartford, Conn., shortly after the court ruled the that state child protection officials aren't violating the rights of her 17-year-old daughter by forcing the girl to undergo cancer chemotherapy she doesn't want. Fortin's daughter has finished that treatment and is expected to be released from the hospital, Monday, April 27, 2015. (AP Photo/Pat Eaton-Robb, File)

HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) – A 17-year-old Connecticut girl forced by the courts to undergo chemotherapy for her cancer has finished that treatment and was expected to be released Monday from the hospital.

The teen, identified only as Cassandra C, told The Associated Press in a text message that she likely would be discharged from the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center on Monday afternoon.

“I have less than 48 hours left in this hospital and I couldn’t be happier!” she posted on Facebook on Saturday.

Doctors say her Hodgkin lymphoma, diagnosed in September, is in remission. Cassandra posted photos Friday after having the ports used to administer the chemo removed from her body.

Cassandra and her mother initially refused the chemotherapy. They have said they wanted to explore more natural alternative treatments.

The state Department of Children and Families stepped in and a Juvenile Court judge removed her from her home and ordered her to undergo chemo.

The case eventually went to the state Supreme Court, which ruled in January that Connecticut wasn’t violating Cassandra’s rights.

The case centered on whether the girl was mature enough to determine how to treat her cancer. Several other states recognize the mature minor doctrine.

Cassandra has been confined to the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center in Hartford, where she underwent six rounds of treatment that doctors say will give her an 85 percent chance of survival.

She said doctors told her in early March that her cancer was in remission and posted on Facebook that she was grateful she had responded well to the drugs and never wanted to die.

“I stood up and fought for my rights , and I don’t regret it,” she said.

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