Ryan: Short-term spending bill needed to prevent shutdown

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., right, and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., leave a news conference following a GOP caucus meeting, at the Republican National Headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015. Ryan dismissed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's comments on Muslims, saying such views are "not what this party stands for and more importantly it's not what this country stands for." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Speaker of the House Paul Ryan, R-Wis., right, and Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy, R-Calif., leave a news conference following a GOP caucus meeting, at the Republican National Headquarters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 8, 2015. Ryan dismissed Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump's comments on Muslims, saying such views are "not what this party stands for and more importantly it's not what this country stands for." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House will pass a short-term bill to prevent the government from shutting down this weekend, Speaker Paul Ryan said on Tuesday. .

The announcement from the Wisconsin Republican came as talks on a sweeping $1.1 trillion governmentwide spending bill continue slowly.

The government is currently operating under a short-term spending bill that expires at midnight on Friday. The new stopgap spending bill will buy time for talks on the bigger measure.

“We need to get it right,” Ryan said of the broader measure. “I don’t want us to go home until we get this done.”

The full-year spending bill is the main unresolved item on the congressional agenda as lawmakers look to wrap up the session and head home for the holidays. Democrats, backed up by President Barack Obama, have adopted a hard line against numerous GOP policy provisions woven into the 12 spending bills that serve as the template for what promises to be one huge bill known as an omnibus in Washington-speak.

Republicans are holding out for policy “riders” that would, for instance, block new rules on power-plant emissions, stall a new Labor Department rule requiring financial advisors to avoid conflicts of interest when structuring retirement accounts, and curb new clean water rules.

“I think they’re trying to jam us,” said Rep. Tom Cole, R-Okla.

Another key item involves extending several dozen popular tax breaks for individuals and business. House GOP leaders unveiled a two-year measure extending tax breaks such as the research and development tax credit. Talks on a more ambitious tax measure permanently extending some of the tax breaks have stalled.

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