Automotive worker conducts ‘Narcan training session’ for 75+ businesses

Narcan used to offset side effects of heroin overdose. (WDTN Photo/Paul Rodzinka)
Narcan used to offset side effects of heroin overdose. (WDTN Photo/Paul Rodzinka)

BUTLER TOWNSHIP, Ohio (WDTN) – Some business owners are taking action against the opioid crisis to keep employees safe and ultimately save lives.

Tuesday night, more than 75 local business owners came together at Celebrations II Banquet Center to learn how to use Narcan–the opioid overdose reversal drug.

The training session was started by Cindy Davidson–a local auto shop owner–who saw a story on 2 NEWS about an Ohio police officer who accidentally overdosed on fentanyl and was revived by Narcan.

Just like there’s first aid kit in every workplace, Davidson says she wants Narcan to be right next to it.

Cindy Davidson is starting a new engine–a network of proactive auto workers, fighting back against the opioid epedemic.

“We as society,” Davidson said. “Have to do something to save everybody.”

That’s why Davidson–who owns a local autoshop–teamed up with law enforcement to organize a training session for other auto workers, teaching them how to detect heroin and fentanyl and what to do if they come in contact with it, which can be common. If someone overdoses behind the wheel, many times a tow service is called to tow the car.

“Maybe that power becomes dust all over the car,” Davidson said. “Then I have an employee get into the car and he’s chemically exposed and I didn’t know what just happened to him.”

If someone’s overdosing, they appear dizzy, confused and struggling to breathe. That’s exactly what happened to an East Liverpool Police Officer who accidentally overdosed when he came in contact with fentanyl during a traffic stop. After being Narcan, he was revived.

“Get Narcan training,” Montgomery County Sheriff Phil Plummer said. “In case one of your employees gets exposed because we want to save people.”

All 75 business owners left Tuesday night’s with a box of Narcan. Davidson hopes word of the training spreads so other business aren’t left in the dark.

“Your employees will respect you alot more,” Davidson said. “If they see that you do care and that you are being proactive about their health.”

 

 

WDTN.com provides commenting to allow for constructive discussion on the stories we cover. In order to comment here, you acknowledge you have read and agreed to our Terms of Service. Commenters who violate these terms, including use of vulgar language or racial slurs, will be banned. Please be respectful of the opinions of others and keep the conversation on topic and civil. If you see an inappropriate comment, please flag it for our moderators to review.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s