5 mosquitoes test positive for West Nile Virus in Clark County

FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2016, file photo, a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquires a blood meal on the arm of a researcher at the Biomedical Sciences Institute in the Sao Paulo's University in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Aedes aegypti mosquito is behind the large outbreaks of Zika virus in Latin America and the Caribbean. On Friday, July 29, 2016, Florida said four Zika infections in the Miami area are likely the first caused by mosquito bites in the continental U.S. All previous U.S. cases have been linked to outbreak countries. (AP Photo/Andre Penner, File)
FILE - In this Jan. 18, 2016, file photo, a female Aedes aegypti mosquito acquires a blood meal on the arm of a researcher at the Biomedical Sciences Institute in the Sao Paulo's University in Sao Paulo, Brazil. The Aedes aegypti mosquito is behind the large outbreaks of Zika virus in Latin America and the Caribbean. On Friday, July 29, 2016, Florida said four Zika infections in the Miami area are likely the first caused by mosquito bites in the continental U.S. All previous U.S. cases have been linked to outbreak countries. (AP Photo/Andre Penner, File)

SPRINGFIELD, Ohio (WDTN) — The Clark County Combined Health District announced five more mosquitoes tested positive for West Nile Virus.

So far in 2017, nine mosquitoes have tested positive for the virus in the county.

The CCCHD says the positive samples were collected on the southwest, west and east sides of Springfield and in German Township.

Neighboring counties have also reported positive samples.

West Nile Virus is most commonly spread by infected mosquitoes. It can lead to severe fever, encephalitis (inflammation of the brain) or meningitis (inflammation of the lining of the brain and spinal cord).

The CCCHD says mosquitoes become infected when they feed on infected birds. Infected mosquitoes can then spread the virus to humans and other animals when they bite.

Nearly 80 percent of people who are infected with West Nile Virus won’t show any symptoms, but there is no way to know in advance if you will develop an illness or not.  Those who do develop symptoms usually do so between three to 14 days after they are bitten by the infected mosquito:

The CCCHD says to avoid contracting West Nile Virus do the following:

  • When outdoors, use repellents containing DEET, picaridin, IR3535, oil of lemon eucalyptus or para-menthane-diol.  Follow the directions on the package.
  • Many mosquitoes are most active from dusk to dawn.  Be sure to use insect repellent and wear long sleeves and pants at these times or consider staying indoors during these hours.
  • Make sure you have good screens on your windows and doors to keep mosquitoes out.
  • Get rid of mosquito breeding sites by emptying standing water from flower pots, buckets and barrels.  Change the water in pet dishes, and replace the water in bird baths weekly.  Keep roof gutters clear of debris that prevents water from draining and children’s wading pools empty and stored inside when they aren’t being used.

The CCCHD has taken the following steps to contain West Nile Virus: 

  • Conducted nighttime mosquito misting in the areas with more dense human population.
  • Hosted two tire disposal events that disposed of approximately 7,500 tires to reduce mosquito breeding sites.
  • Mitigated numerous mosquito breeding sites in response to residents’ complaints.   

For more information contact the CCCHD at 937-390-5600 or go to our website at www.ccchd.com.

 

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