How an 86-year-old bricklayer won the U.S.’s only ski jumping medal

Ski jumping

Picture an Olympian standing atop the podium overwhelmed with pride as their national anthem plays in the background and a medal is placed around their neck. The pressure of a lifetime of training is lifted off their shoulders. The goal that athlete has dedicated their life to, now achieved.

Bet you didn’t picture an 86-year-old.

But that’s what Team USA’s Anders Haugen accomplished … sort of.

Haugen won the U.S.’s only Olympic ski jumping medal, but by no means was it conventional.

A part-time bricklayer, Haugen led the U.S. ski jumping team at the first modern Winter Games in Chamonix, France, in 1924.

Haugen placed fourth in the event, just behind Norway’s Thorleif Haug, who had already won three gold medals at the games. No disputes, no controversy, no questions.

It wasn’t until 1974 – 50 years later – that the history-altering mistake was found.

Norway – which also won the gold and silver in the event – held a 50th anniversary celebration. While glossing over the scores, skiing historian Jacob Vaage noticed a mathematical error.

Haugen’s score was correctly totaled to 17.916 points.

The catch? Haug’s scores had incorrectly been added up to a flat 18.000, rather than the correct 17.821 points. Stay in school, kids.

That put Haugen .095 points ahead of Haug, overtaking him for the bronze medal … just 50 short years after the event.

The IOC was notified and so, at a special ceremony in Oslo, Norway in 1974, Haugen was finally awarded his bronze medal by Haug’s daughter.

They say you can’t rewrite history, but Anders Haugen would tell you otherwise.

WDTN.com provides commenting to allow for constructive discussion on the stories we cover. In order to comment here, you acknowledge you have read and agreed to our Terms of Service. Commenters who violate these terms, including use of vulgar language or racial slurs, will be banned. Please be respectful of the opinions of others and keep the conversation on topic and civil. If you see an inappropriate comment, please flag it for our moderators to review.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s